Other people’s Portable Wargame battle reports: More Zulu War action

A few days ago Ross Macfarlane staged a Zulu War battle using 54mm-scale figures and my PORTABLE WARGAME rules.

This battle looked like it was great fun to fight, and a fuller battle report can be found on Ross’s blog.


Please note that the photographs featured above are © Ross Macfarlane.

Other people’s Portable Wargame battle reports: The Battle of Isandlwana

Recently Mike Lewis and Anthony Morton staged a re-fight of the Battle of Isandlwana using 54mm-scale figures and my PORTABLE WARGAME rules.

To my no doubt biased eyes the results look spectacular, and a full battle report can be found on Mike’s blog.


Please note that the photographs featured above are © Mike Lewis.

Mimi, Toutou, and Kingani

I am about to start writing what I think will be the last chapter of my book about gridded naval wargames, and it will feature an explanatory battle report about the fight between the British gunboats Mimi and Toutou and their German opponent, Kingani.

The models I am using are approximately 1:600th-scale and were built from various bits and pieces I had in my spares box; in other words, some spare ships’ boats and light guns from Airfix warship kits. For ease of handling they were stuck on pieces of Plasticard and labelled. They are not the most beautiful models I have every built, but they serve me well enough in several tabletop battles.

Mimi

Toutou

Kingani

The story of how Mimi and Toutou got to a lake in the centre of Africa is an epic tale that inspired C S Forester to write THE AFRICAN QUEEN and would make a wonderful film.


Soldiers of the Queen (SOTQ): Issue 170

The latest copy of SOTQ (Soldiers of the Queen, the quarterly journal of the Victorian Military Society) arrived in the post on Monday, and I have been reading it over the past couple of days.

The articles included in this issue are:

  • ‘With a master eye he saw what was needed and did it’: Kitchener’s Indian Army reforms 1902-1909 by David Snape
  • In Defence of a Forgotten General: Lieutenant-General Sir Edwin Alfred Hervey Alderson (1859-1927) by Dr Andrew Windrow
  • Letter to the Editor
  • Captain Willingham Franklin Richardson RE (1843-1875): From Hampshire to the Himalayas by Richard Voss
  • Book Reviews by Dr Roger T Stearn
  • Officers of the Victorian Military Society

This was yet another issue full of interesting articles. I particularly enjoyed David Snape’s ‘With a master eye he saw what was needed and did it’ as it explained why the reforms were necessary and how they laid the foundations of the British Indian Army that took part in the First and Second World Wars.


Soldiers of the Queen (SOTQ): Issue 169

The latest copy of SOTQ (Soldiers of the Queen, the quarterly journal of the Victorian Military Society) was delivered whilst on Saturday, and I finished reading it last night.

The articles included in this issue are:

  • Burnaby’s Deadly Weapon: A recent addition to the Household Cavalry Museum’s collection by Christopher Joll
  • Guards Mounted Infantry in South Africa, 1901-02 by Dr Andrew Windrow
  • VMS Seminar: Invasions Scares and the ‘Battle of Dorking’
  • Diehards commemorate Zulu War Hero
  • Alexis Soyer visits the British Military Cemetery at Haidar Pasha by Dr Mike Hinton
  • British Army General and Generalship, 1837-1902: A review of recent literature by Dr Harold E Raugh, Jr.
  • Book Reviews
  • About the VMS

Yet another issue that was full of interesting articles. As Frederick Burnaby is a particular hero of mine, the first article in this issue was of great interest to me, and the advertisement for the forthcoming seminar reminded me that I really ought to consider booking a place.


The death of General Gordon.

One hundred and thirty two years ago today, the Mahdist forces entered Khartoum. During the defence of his headquarters, General Charles ‘Chinese’ Gordon was killed.


Charles George Gordon was born in Woolwich on 28th January, 1833. (The family home faced westwards toward Woolwich Common, and was demolished as part of an urban regeneration scheme.)

His father was Major General Henry William Gordon, and after attending school in Taunton, Somerset, Charles attended the Royal Military Academy, Woolwich, to train as an officer in the Royal Engineers.

He graduated as a Second Lieutenant in June 1852, and was promoted to be a full Lieutenant in January 1854.

He served in the Crimea before commanding the Ever Victorious Army during the Taiping Rebellion in China. After a spell in Gravesend, Kent, where he was in charge of the improvements to London’s defences, he went to the Sudan for the first time. During his time there he did much to suppress the slave trade and to improve conditions for the population.

When the situation in the Sudan worsened after the Mahdist uprising, Gordon was asked to return there to ensure the safe extraction of Egyptian troops and civilians. He chose to disobey his orders, and decided to defend the capital of the Sudan, Khartoum. After a siege that lasted many months, the Mahdists finally broke through the city’s defences, and General Gordon was killed during the fighting.


Soldiers of the Queen (SOTQ): Issue 168

The latest copy of SOTQ (Soldiers of the Queen, the quarterly journal of the Victorian Military Society) was delivered whilst I was on my most recent cruise, and I have only just had a chance to read it.

The articles included in this issue are:

  • Avenging the Martyr: Markham’s Raid on Nukapu by Frank Jastrzembski
  • Tirah Campaign Veterans: Post-Discharge Experiences by John Sly
  • ‘A very disastrous engagement’: The Battle of iSandlwana re-enactment 2017 by Tim Rose
  • Private Patrick Walsh, 45th Regiment, and his badge by Brett Hendey
  • ‘Florence Nightingale before the Royal Commission’: Some observations on the essay by David Snape by Mike Hinton
  • Book Reviews
  • About the VMS

Yet another issue that was full of interesting and somewhat different articles. I found the article about the lives of the Torah Campaign Veterans particularly interesting because I have some idea about the amount of genealogical research such an article must have taken.

Inside the journal was a flyer advertising the VMS Seminar that will be held in May 2018. It is entitled ‘Invasions Scares and the ‘Battle of Dorking’ and I must admit that I am sorely tempted to go if it is at all possible.