The Battle of Warsaw, 1920: Some photographs

Unfortunately I was only able to take photographs of the tabletop at the end of the battle, but I hope that the following images will give regular blog readers a flavour of the wargame.

The Soviet XVI Army (commanded by Alan Buddles) pushing towards Warsaw’s main line of defences.

Polish armour and artillery.

The only Soviet breakthrough was achieved by units from Soviet III Army. The Soviet cavalry seen at the top right of the photograph were the only Soviet troops to penetrate the Polish defences around Warsaw … but they were too little, too late.

Soviet XVI Army’s traction engine-drawn heavy siege artillery. Their arrival on the battlefield was delayed due to the action of Polish partisans … or was it due to Soviet inefficiency or reactionary sabotage. No doubt a post-battle interrogation of the artillery’s commander will arrive at the truth. 

Polish aircraft played a vital role in the gathering of information about the location of the Soviet forces.

Polish armour, infantry, and artillery in action.

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8 Comments on “The Battle of Warsaw, 1920: Some photographs”

  1. Chris Kemp says:

    Always a delight to see modern technology where it belongs – pressed into support of the Cavalry!
    It looks as if it was an excellent day, Bob.

    Kind regards, Chris.

  2. Pete. says:

    A very nice looking game- I beginning to develop a fondness for the interwar period- games like that certainly encourage it.

    Cheers,

    Pete.

  3. Chris says:

    Bob,

    Did the players use your rules? (The board is gridded, but…)

    Best regards,

    Chris

  4. Steven Page says:

    Any game featuring a Road locomotive is worthy of note! Looks like a fine battle.-Steve

  5. Chris Kemp,

    It was a great wargame to take part in … but I would have loved to have had more cavalry!

    All the best,

    Bob

  6. Pete,

    The interwar period has an interesting balance of weaponry and tactics. It is well worth pursuing as a wargaming project.

    All the best,

    Bob

  7. Chris,

    The rules we used were Richard Brooks's OP14 rules.

    All the best,

    Bob

  8. Steven Page,

    Steam traction engines, heavy artillery, biplanes, cavalry, and infantry … what's not to like?

    All the best,

    Bob


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